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How to Talk Scouse

March 21, 2017

England is a relatively small country, but it boasts a surprisingly high number of variations of the English language—accents, dialects, and, of course, slang. Here’s a look at Scouse, the uniquely colorful (and often inscrutable) jargon specific to the Beatles’ old stomping grounds of Liverpool, where “Scouse” is also the name many people call themselves.
Liverpool

Goin’ the ozzy:

to be treated in the hospital.

Wool:

someone from the rural outskirts of Liverpool.

Arl fella:

one’s father.

Ye ma:

someone else’s mother.

Antwacky:

old-fashioned.

Butty:

a sandwich.

Clobber:

clothing.

Kecks:

pants.

Trabs:

sneakers.

Jarg:

of poor quality.

Beaut:

an idiot.

Texan:

an arrogant idiot.

Soft lad:

an affectionate name for an idiot.

Meff:

someone who smells bad and dresses poorly.

Manc:

a worker in the local cotton mills.

Sozz:

“Sorry.”

Ta:

“Thanks.”

Sweve on it:

“Don’t bother.”

Do one:

“Scram!”

Deffo:

“Definitely!”

Ar ‘ey:

“Oh no!”

Come ‘ead:

“Let’s do it!”

Ye wha?

“Come again?”

Bevvy:

a drink, particularly beer.

Bevvied up:

drunk.

On one:

reckless.

Rocket:

the beginning and end of the local M62 motorway (or freeway).

Bizzies:

police.

Down the banks:

to tell someone off in public.

Jib him off:

to skip out on plans without telling anyone.

Geggin’ in:

when an uninvited guest invites themselves along.

Sagging off:

playing hooky, staying home.

On me bill:

to be alone.

Cracking the flags:

the weather is warm.

Boss:

something that’s very good.

Made up:

the state of being very happy.

Scratch:

welfare.

Scally:

Liverpool youth.

Gerry and his ferry:

1960s Liverpool band Gerry and the Pacemakers, who had major international success with the hit “Ferry Cross the Mersey.” (The Mersey is the river that runs through Liverpool.)

Plazee Scouser:

someone who speaks with a fake Liverpudlian accent and uses Scouse slang in order to seem like an authentic.

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